Before the Opera Ghost

Victory and The Wicked DarlingIt’s October, a perfect time to discuss movies with a spooky flair. Over the last month, it’s been a bonanza for Lon Chaney fans, myself included, with a half-dozen unseen films now available.

 

Okay, I’m stretching the truth a little. The dual release of Victory (1919) and The Wicked Darling (1919, with the always delightful Priscilla Dean) by Flicker Alley has been available for a while, but I’m just now adding it to my collection.

 

TriumphHowever, Grapevine Video has just released Triumph, a 1917 feature with Dorothy Phillips. Only thee reels of this film survive, but three is better than nothing.

 

Meanwhile, Undercrank Productions has released Lon Chaney: Before the Thousand Faces. This disc contains three rare Universal features from 1915-16, all of which also survive only in a partial state. The three incomplete features are A Mother’s Atonement, If My Country Should Call, and The Place Beyond the Wind.

 

Before the Thousand FacesWhat is most interesting about these releases are that they fall in that period, pre-twenties, before Chaney made himself a household name. Still ahead were Phantom of the Opera, Hunchback of Notre Dame, and Tell it to the Marines, to name a few.

 

Yet even at this early stage, Chaney’s talent is undeniable, while already demonstrating his ability at playing a chameleon.

 

Happy Halloween!

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Cinema Houston celebrates a vibrant century of movie theatres and moviegoing in Texas’s largest city. This weblog is a companion to the Book, Cinema Houston: From Nickelodeon to Megaplex (University of Texas Press, 2007), and website, www.CinemaHouston.net.

David Welling is a writer and artist who lives in Houston with his wife and two children. His lifelong interest in movies (and the places that show them) led to the writing of Cinema Houston, which included fifteen years of research, and its subsequent website.


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