Stage 28 Update

RazedSite

All the concern and effort in preserving Stage 28 has come to naught. The stage was razed on September 20.

Photo courtesy of InsideUniversal.net

RazedSite2

Advertisements

1 Response to “Stage 28 Update”


  1. 1 David Jendrycki October 5, 2014 at 9:59 pm

    The destruction of Stage 28 is incredibly sad for all true movie fans, It was lovingly preserved by Universal for over 90 years because of the pride and historic background that the movie studio had for it. Unfortunately the CEO, Ron Meyer and his staff are not movie fans but only fans of money. Tearing this down to make way for a theme park ride says it all. Many film historians and cinephiles across the world have pleaded with them to come up with a better plan but to no avail. Universal is no longer a movie studio. It is no longer run by movie makers. it is only a money making machine preying on Hollywood tourists. Sad,sad, sad. I will never enter their gates again. Farewell Carl Laemmle. Farewell Lon Chaney.Farewell to the the beautiful and sweet Carla Laemmle. Your memories will be remembered by true movie lovers everywhere!
    David Jendrycki
    Chicago


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Cinema Houston celebrates a vibrant century of movie theatres and moviegoing in Texas’s largest city. This weblog is a companion to the Book, Cinema Houston: From Nickelodeon to Megaplex (University of Texas Press, 2007), and website, www.CinemaHouston.net.

David Welling is a writer and artist who lives in Houston with his wife and two children. His lifelong interest in movies (and the places that show them) led to the writing of Cinema Houston, which included fifteen years of research, and its subsequent website.


%d bloggers like this: